Damaging nationwide storm to cause $3 billion in damages and economic losses, AccuWeather estimates

By John Roach, AccuWeather staff writer
April 12, 2019, 7:56:50 AM EDT


AccuWeather estimates the damage and economic loss from the intense storm causing blizzards, thunderstorms and severe weather across much of the U.S. will total $3 billion, based on an analysis of damages already inflicted and those expected to occur.

This estimate is in addition to, and separate from, the $12.5 billion in total damage and economic loss estimated to result from record-breaking flooding in the Midwestern U.S. this spring, according to AccuWeather founder and CEO Dr. Joel N. Myers.

Satellite of storm

A massive storm wreaks havoc over the central U.S. on Thursday, April 11, 2019. (Satellite/NOAA)


The $3 billion estimate for the whole life of the storm includes the financial impact to the roughly 200 million people affected, costs and losses to businesses, insurance, flight cancellations, rail traffic, highway transportation, power outages, closings and the resultant flooding that will follow over the next week or so.


There were at least 1,530 flight cancellations just into and out of Denver International Airport and Minneapolis/St. Paul International Airport combined on Wednesday and Thursday, according to FlightAware.com.

Norbeck and Mansfield, South Dakota, received more than two feet of snow, as of Thursday night and 4- to 5-foot drifts were reported in Red Elm, South Dakota.

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