Elliot Abrams

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Sandy Leaves the Scene

October 31, 2012; 10:47 AM ET

Wednesday noon

In today's video, we look at the weather outlook through the coming weekend and early next week. The weather will generally favorable for the massive restoration and repair efforts now underway in the wake of Sandy. The chill is a challenge for keeping warm when there is no power, yet it is not cold enough to preserve food that could not be kept refrigerated or frozen.

One interesting feature is a storm that the GFS places along the East coast next Tuesday. Last night's ECMWF also had a storm nearby. Anytime during the colder parts of the year when there is a coastal storm and cold air is nearby, there is concern about snow. Since Tuesday is Election Day, any storminess may be an issue. We'll be watching this with you during the next few days.

A few people have asked why the storm's winds from the middle of Pennsylvania to the middle of New York state were not as strong as they might have been. This map does not show the root cause of this occurrence, but in the pressure pattern, you can see the greater separation in the isobars in that area compared with the situation around the rest of the storm. This map shows the setup about 6-12 hours after the highest winds had occurred, but the shape was similar then.

Amazingly, the European model suggested this northward elongation in its forecast 210 hours in advance. It was a little slow on the storm's position but it was still an impressive forecast:

Randy Adkins, one of our fine meteorologists at AccuWeather, compiled this summary (as of Tuesday night) about Sandy:

While there were many differences, Sandy was New York City's Katrina.

HIGHEST RAINFALL TOTALS BY STATE:

***Andrews AFB, Md.: 15.3" (unconfirmed)

Easton, Md.: 12.55"

Wildwood Crest, N.J.: 11.91"

Georgetown, Del.: 10.20"

Reedville, Va.: 9.90"

Salvo, N.C.: 8.09"

Maysville, W.Va.: 7.75"

Hanover, Pa.: 7.61"

Washington, D.C. (5.1 NW) : 5.83"

Kirtland, Ohio: 5.69"

Gorham, N.H.: 4.85"

Whitesville, N.Y.: 4.83"

North Ashburnham, Mass.: 3.70"

Woonsocket, R.I.: 1.87"

HIGHEST WIND GUSTS BY STATE:

Eatons Neck, N.Y.: 94 mph

Tompkinsville, N.J.: 90 mph

Westerly, R.I.: 86 mph

Madison, Conn.: 85 mph

Cuttyhunk, Mass.: 83 mph

Allentown, Pa.: 81 mph

Highland Beach, Md.: 79 mph

Chester Gap, Va.: 79 mph

Bath, Maine: 76 mph

Fort Gratiot: Mich.: 74 mph

Stowe, Vt.: 72 mph

Goshen, N.H.: 70 mph

Cleveland, Ohio (BKL): 67 mph

Ranson, W.Va.: 65 mph

HIGHEST SNOW AMOUNTS BY STATE:

Redhouse, Md.: 29.0"

Davis, W.Va.: 28.0"

Norton, Va.: 24.0"

Faust, N.C.: 24"

Gatlinburg (7SE, in the mountains), Tenn.: 22.0"

Payne Gap, Ky.: 14.0"

Champion, Pa.: 13.0"

Bellefontaine, Ohio: 4.5"

POWER OUTAGES: 7.4 million

By comparison, Hurricane Ike had 7.5 million over his entire path.

TOP WAVES:

39.67 feet (Buoy #41048)

TOP STORM SURGES:

The Battery, N.Y.: ~9 feet above normal

Kings Point, N.Y.: ~12.5 feet above normal

New Haven, Conn.: ~9 feet above normal

LOWEST PRESSURE (LAND):

945.5 mb (27.92" Hg) at Atlantic City, N.J.

The views expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of AccuWeather, Inc. or AccuWeather.com

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About This Blog

Elliot Abrams
Elliot Abrams from AccuWeather.com offers this Northeast Weather Blog for the U.S. with regular updates on NE weather from a leading forecaster and meteorologist.