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    Elliot Abrams

    Blizzard of '13 for Eastern New England

    By Elliot Abrams, AccuWeather chief meteorologist
    2/08/2013, 7:12:58 AM

    Friday 11:45 a.m.

    A strengthening storm off the Virginia coast will move northeastward to send gales and heavy snow into eastern New England tonight. Of course, that's not the only place getting snow... just that worst of the storm should hit there. This video shows how things should transpire:

    Please keep in mind this report is only done once, but you can get updates 24/7 elsewhere on our site.

    This radar shows the area with the heaviest rain as of late morning. The storm will continue northeastward where the presence of cold air means heavy snow will fall.


    590x460_02081637_screen-shot-2013-02-08-at-11


    A storm that will whip snow into car-capturing, truck-trapping, bus-blocking, SUV-stalling drifts in eastern New England was centered east of Virginia at midday. By late tomorrow night, it will be transforming into monstrous offshore storm. As it gains strength, it will churn the ocean into a boiling cauldron of battering, beach-blasting breakers that can damage, decimate and destroy dunes. Cloudbursts of rain soak cities along the Middle Atlantic coast to the accompaniment of spring style thunderstorms. From Pennsylvania to western New England, the snow will fall without a great amount of wind. Places from new New York City through Providence, Boston and Portland will be buried under a blanket of heavy snow. Near the snow/rain line, giant marshmallow snow globs will aggregate into a pasty plaster that can topple trees as if they were toothpicks and snap electric and telephone wires as if they were telephone and electric wires. At the height of the storm, anyone outside will face a fearsome blizzard. Innocent snowflakes turn to painfully stinging missiles, darts and tacks, propelled by gusting gales that scream over the seas and roar through the woods. In other words, high winds produce a crystalline ticker-tape parade of snowflakes: furiously falling and flowing flakes filling the fields, whisking past the windows, gliding to the ground and beautifying the bushes. The wild wind whips the snow into roadside rows and churns roof top snow into a creamy concoction with meandering smoky membranes of snow granules that dance to the edges and cascade down the sides. The storm's gusty gales whip the snow into car-capturing, truck-trapping, bus-blocking, SUV-stalling drifts. It is among the great storms, one of the atmosphere's awesome displays of change and violence among the momentous events that over time have shaped and changed the course of human events in ways wondrous and ominous.

    The views expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of AccuWeather, Inc. or AccuWeather.com

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