Get AccuWeather alerts right in your browser!
Enable Notifications

Deadly heat wave to worsen this week as recovery from Cyclone Fani continues

By Eric Leister, AccuWeather senior meteorologist
May 11, 2019, 7:34:16 AM EDT

Cyclone Fani cleanup (AP)

Locals clean up damage made by Cyclone Fani in the Penthakata fishing village of Puri, in the eastern Indian state of Orissa, Saturday, May 4, 2019. (AP Photo)


Areas recovering from destructive Cyclone Fani will have to endure dangerous temperatures this week as a heat wave builds across northern and eastern India.

There will continue to be areas of blowing dust through Friday, which will lower visibility and air quality levels.

The heat already turned deadly with at least three deaths from sunstroke reported in Andhra Pradesh, according to OneIndia.

Seven deaths and more than 300 people have been hospitalized due to the intense heat since mid-March in Maharashtra, according to The Indian Express.

Just days after Cyclone Fani struck northeast Andhra Pradesh, parts of the state saw temperatures soar above 45 C (113 F) on Monday.


This heat will continue to build and expand northward through cyclone-ravaged states of Odisha and West Bengal in the coming days.

Brahmapur, Puri, Bhubaneswar, Kharagpur and Kolkata will remain dangerously hot into the weekend.

India 5/6


Cyclone Fani became the strongest cyclone to strike India in the past 20 years last Friday when it made landfall near Puri with winds equal to a Category 3 hurricane in the Atlantic and east Pacific.

The cyclone claimed at least 38 lives in Odisha, 25 of which were in Puri, according to the Times of India. A total of 42 people died in India with more than 10 million people still affected by the storm.

Fani also caused 17 deaths and 45 injuries in Bangladesh as the storm moved inland and weakened.

(AP Photo)

A destroyed fuel filing station by cyclone Fani after its landfall is seen on the outskirts of Puri, in the Indian state of Odisha, Friday, May 3, 2019.

(AP Photo)

Street shops are seen collapsed due to gusty winds preceding the landfall of cyclone Fani on the outskirts of Puri, in the Indian state of Odisha, Friday, May 3, 2019.

(Twitter photo/@vbroutray)

A native of Puri, India, rides through his hometown during the evening hours after Fani inflicted damage upon the area.

(Twitter photo/@Odisha_Police)

Cuttack, India, has taken a pounding from Fani, which left several trees uprooted in the area. Local police officials work to remove downed trees from blocked roads on May 3, 2019.

(Twitter photo/@vbroutray)

A native of Puri, India, rides through his hometown during the evening hours after Fani inflicted damage upon the area.

(STR/AP)

Damaged signage lies on a street in Puri district after Cyclone Fani hit the coastal eastern state of Odisha, India, Friday, May 3, 2019.

(Twitter photo/@vbroutray)

A native of Puri, India, rides through his hometown during the evening hours after Fani inflicted damage upon the area.

(STR/AP)

Damaged structures and uprooted tress lie along a road in Puri district after Cyclone Fani hit the coastal eastern state of Odisha, India, Friday, May 3, 2019.

(Twitter photo/@DCP_Cuttack)

A downed tree blocks off a road in Cuttack, India, on May 3, 2019.

(Twitter photo/@pattaprateek)

A resident of Bhubaneswar, India, took this image from his apartment's balcony during impacts from Fani on May 3, 2019. "Nothing is visible beyond a few meters now," Prateek Pattanaik tweeted.

(AP Photo)

An abandoned house and trees bend with gusty winds ahead of the landfall of cyclone Fani on the outskirts of Puri, in the Indian state of Odisha, Friday, May 3, 2019.

(AP Photo)

Street shops are seen collapsed due to gusty winds ahead of the landfall of cyclone Fani on the outskirts of Puri, in the Indian state of Odisha, Friday, May 3, 2019.

(AP Photo)

Villagers move to safer places amidst gusty winds ahead of the landfall of cyclone Fani on the outskirts of Puri, in the Indian state of Odisha, Friday, May 3, 2019.

(Twitter photo/@pattaprateek)

A resident of Bhubaneswar, India, took this image from his apartment's balcony during impacts from Fani on May 3, 2019.

(NOAA)

The NOAA 20 satellite captured this image of an enormous and powerful Cyclone Fani churning over the Bay of Bengal on April 30, 2019, as it barreled toward India's east coast.

(Image/NOAA/RAMMB)

Fani bearing down on eastern India early Friday, May 3, 2019.

(AP Photo/Bikas Das)

Stewardess and stranded passengers wait outside the Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose international airport after all flights were suspended following cyclone Fani landfall in eastern coast, in Kolkata, India, Friday, May 3, 2019.


As recovery efforts continue, residents and aid workers will face dangerous heat with temperatures near 38 C (100 F) at the coast and 40-43 C (104-110 F) for locations farther inland.

The hottest locations on any given day will endure temperatures near 45-46 C (113-115 F).

The dangerous heat will not be confined to areas that were affected by Cyclone Fani as heat builds throughout all of eastern and northern India.

Cyclone Fani destruction (AP)


Locations from Jharkhand and Bihar northwest to Punjab and Rajasthan will all endure several days of intense heat with daily high temperatures of 41-44 C (105-112 F).

This threat will include New Delhi and all of the National Capital Region (NCR). Temperatures in New Delhi have already approached 43 C (110 F) on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.

Temperatures may trend slightly lower next week; however, no lasting relief is expected from the heat outside of areas that see a brief shower or thunderstorm on any given day. Most thunderstorms will be confined to the higher elevations.

RELATED:
India Weather Center
Interactive India weather satellite
Heat exhaustion vs. heatstroke: What are the warning signs and how should you react?

It will be important for residents to take extra care in the heat to prevent illness. Drinking plenty of water, spending time in the shade and wearing light clothing will be necessary. When possible, strenuous outdoor activity should be avoided during the hottest part of the day.

Stagnant conditions contributing to the high heat will also result in dangerously poor air quality conditions. Face masks should be worn by anyone spending time outdoors. Children, the elderly and those with respiratory or cardiovascular health conditions should avoid spending time outside as much as possible.

More than 6,000 heat-related deaths have been reported in India since 2010, according to the Times of India.

Download the free AccuWeather app to view the latest temperature forecast for your community.

Report a Typo

Comments

Comments that don't add to the conversation may be automatically or manually removed by Facebook or AccuWeather. Profanity, personal attacks, and spam will not be tolerated.

More Weather News