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    Train of Storms Right Through Thanksgiving

    By By Alex Sosnowski, expert senior meteorologist.
    November 17, 2012, 10:58:23 AM EST

    While the weather over much of the nation will be benign and often not non-eventful, Mother Nature will not be so kind to the Northwest.

    A train of storms will roll into the region with low-elevation rain and mountain snow right through Thanksgiving Day.

    Approximately one storm a day will roll ashore.

    According to Western Weather Expert Ken Clark, the storms will generate large waves over the northern Pacific and drive them eastward.

    "The coast will take a pounding with offshore waves topping 20 feet and near-shore waves averaging 6 to 12 feet," Clark said.

    Each storm pulse will kick up strong winds on the coast and west-facing slopes and passes. In these areas, gusts of 50 to 60 mph will be common.


    400x266_11161746_nw


    Snow levels will fluctuate with most of the storm pulses, but they will dip to and below pass levels. The lowest levels, near 2,000 feet in the northern Cascades and 3,500 feet in the southern Cascades, are likely Sunday into Monday and again during the middle of next week closer to the Thanksgiving holiday.


    400x266_11161801_satsnapshot

    The storms have the potential to drop 2 to 4 feet of snow on the high country of the Cascades through Thanksgiving.

    Up to half a foot of rain can fall on the immediate coast and west-facing hillsides of the Olympics.

    Travelers along I-5 in the region should expect periods of slow travel, due to wind-swept rain and low visibility in fog at times. Travelers through Snoqualmie pass and others should be prepared for slippery and snow-covered roads at times.

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