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    Ice Advances to Carolinas; I-20 Faces Freeze-Up

    By By Alex Sosnowski, AccuWeather.com senior meteorologist.
    February 18, 2015, 12:18:50 AM EST

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    Snow and an icy mix will continue to expand across the Carolinas through Monday night, while the I-20 corridor to the south faces a freeze-up risk Monday night.

    Much of the South has avoided wintry travel thus far this winter. However, cold air and a storm system is far enough to the south for snow and ice to spread from the Ohio and Tennessee valleys to the mid-Atlantic and Carolinas.

    The live blog for the winter storm gives frequent updates to the travel impacts and growing list of power outages.

    The storm will bring slippery roads, power outages, disruptions to daily activities and airline delays and cancellations.

    While the snow expands eastward into Monday night from the Ohio Valley to the mid-Atlantic, the ice will follow suit and spread from Tennessee to the Carolinas.

    Huntsville, Alabama; Greenville, South Carolina; and Charlotte, Raleigh and Fayetteville, North Carolina, will be on the receiving end of some sleet and freezing rain.


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    Travel along I-40, as well as I-85 through the Carolinas will remain slippery and dangerous through Monday night.

    Within the icy zone of the storm, sleet or a mixture of snow and sleet will generally dominate along the northern fringe with freezing rain in the south.

    Enough freezing rain has and will continue to weigh down some trees and power lines, resulting in power outages. Falling trees and branches can cause additional damage and bodily harm, depending on where they land.

    RELATED:
    Watch the Latest Edition of AccuWeather LIVE
    AccuWeather.com Winter Weather Center
    How to Survive a Power Outage During an Ice Storm

    The battleground between snow totals in excess of 6 inches and the ice will be in northern Tennessee and southern Virginia. Where the winter storm remains a plain snow event, the heavy snow amounts will be measured. Any ice will hold down amounts but will still make for treacherous travel.

    Atlanta should narrowly escape freezing rain due to the rain arriving after temperatures rise above freezing. However, a rush of cold air on the storm's backside could cause any wet spots on untreated roads and sidewalks to turn icy Monday night.


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    The same danger applies westward along the I-20 corridor from Birmingham and Tuscaloosa, Alabama, to Meridian and Jackson, Mississippi. Bridges and overpasses would be the first to turn icy.

    Rain and even a few thunderstorms will otherwise move along the Gulf Coast. The rain should depart New Orleans before Mardi Gras festivities commence on Tuesday.

    Aside from drenching showers and thunderstorms in southern Georgia and Florida, the winter storm will depart the Southeast on Tuesday as it returns snow to already snow-weary New England.

    Another shot of cold air will follow the storm into the South for the second half of this week.

    The cold could create a dangerous situation for those who lose power during the current winter storm as "it may take days to restore power in some communities," stated AccuWeather.com Chief Meteorologist Elliot Abrams.


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    Temperatures during the next several nights will plummet well below freezing southward to just north of I-10. Subfreezing highs will even be recorded in the corridor from Little Rock, Arkansas, to Charlotte, North Carolina, on one or two days later this week.

    Residents are urged to review these tips on how to survive a power outage during an ice storm.


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    AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Kristina Pydynowski contributed to the content of this story.

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