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    Search and rescue ends for missing sailors following US Navy plane crash in western Pacific

    By Eric Leister, AccuWeather senior meteorologist
    November 24, 2017, 9:32:44 AM EST

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    A U.S. Navy transport plane crashed in the Philippine Sea on Wednesday on its way to the USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier.

    Eight people have been rescued and are reported to be in good health following transport to the USS Ronald Reagan, according to the Associated Press.

    The cause of the crash is being investigated. Japanese Minister of Defence Itsunori Onodera told reporters the U.S. Navy had informed him that the crash in the Philippine Sea may have been a result of engine trouble.

    Navy 11/22

    In this March 14, 2017, file photo, a U.S. Navy C-2 Greyhound approaches the deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson. A similar type of the U.S. Navy plane carrying 11 crew and passengers crashed into the Pacific Ocean on Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017, while on the way to the USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier, the Navy said. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)


    The search for three remaining sailors from crash was called off Friday morning, local time.

    The crash occurred about 500 nautical miles southeast of Okinawa over the Philippine Sea at around 2:45 p.m. Japan time.

    “A cold front moving into the search area will bring the threat for showers into Saturday,” said AccuWeather Meteorologist Adam Douty.

    RELATED:
    Japan Weather Center
    Interactive West Pacific weather satellite
    Philippines Weather Center

    “Winds will increase to 15-25 mph during this time which will also cause rough seas at times,” added Douty.

    The front will stall over the area into this weekend, continuing the threat for showers, gusty winds and rough seas.

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