Unusual November snowstorm buries the Northeast. See storm stats & photos in our roundup coverage.

Photos: Blizzard of 2017 drops 42 inches of snow, brings travel to standstill in northeastern US

By Brian Lada, AccuWeather meteorologist and staff writer
March 16, 2017, 10:51:52 AM EDT

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One of the biggest storms of the winter slammed the northeastern United States Monday night into Tuesday night with feet of snow, bringing significant travel disruptions and thousands of power outages.

Over 6,000 flights were canceled across the United States on Tuesday due to the blizzard with hundreds of more cancellations on Wednesday.

Gusts frequented 60 mph from New Jersey to New England with gusts to hurricane force near Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

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Heavy snow also led to road closures, including part of Route 92 in Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania, when a small avalanche blocked the road with snow.

Multiple fatalities have been reported amid the blizzard, according to the Associated Press. One was a 16-year-old girl died when she lost control of her vehicle on a snowy road in Gilford, New Hampshire, and the other was an elderly man who died after being struck by a snow plow truck in East Hartford, Connecticut.

A snow plow driver died in Longmeadow, Massachusetts, as his vehicle was hit by an Amtrak train as it crossed the tracks.

Three people died in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, in relation to the blizzard. All three were due to heart attacks following snow shoveling.

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Snow began falling early on Monday night across Virginia and Pennsylvania, spreading north and eastward by the Tuesday morning commute. The heaviest snow was observed across northeastern Pennsylvania and upstate New York where snowfall rates exceeded 3 inches an hour during the height of the storm.

Many areas from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, to Poughkeepsie, New York, and Burlington, Vermont, picked up 1 to 2 feet of snow through Tuesday evening. West Winfield, New York, was one of the snowiest spots across the entire region with an NWS trained spotter measuring 42 inches of snow.

The 30.4 inches of snow that fell in Burlington is the second highest snowfall total in recorded history for the city. In Binghamton, New York, a 24-hour snowfall record was broken. The total of 31 inches broke the previous record of 23 inches set in February 1961. The snowfall was measured from 3 a.m. Tuesday to 1 a.m. Wednesday.

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Tunkhannock avalanche

The Tunkhannock Township Police report a second slide on SR 92 south, just south of the SR 307 intersection. (Photo/Tunkhannock Township Police)

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25.7 inches of snow on a car in Afton, New York. (Photo/Brent McGrady)


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Snow covers the ground in Lafayette Park across from the White House in Washington, Tuesday, March 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)


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Snow covers the ground in Lafayette Park across from the White House in Washington, Tuesday, March 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

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A person crosses a street in blowing snow during a winter storm Tuesday, March 14, 2017, in Boston. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

Snow car wilkes barre

Snow burrying a car in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. (Photo/Twitter user@DaveSkutnik)




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Snow in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania on Tuesday afternoon. (Photo/Twitter user @DaveSkutnik)

Snow in Otisville

Snow topped two feet in Otisville, New York on Tuesday afternoon. (Photo/Twitter user @ginamarie090)


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The streets of Brooklyn, New York, were covered in snow around 2 a.m. Tuesday. (Photo/Instagram user/Terenaspatrick)

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(Photo/Narragansett Emergency Management Association)

Jeep in snow

Snow in Durham, New York on Tuesday afternoon. (Photo/Twitter user @tperez78)

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