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At least 70 killed as flooding strikes Durban, South Africa

By Eric Leister, AccuWeather senior meteorologist
April 25, 2019, 2:25:55 PM EDT


Heavy rainfall caused deadly flooding and turned roadways into raging rivers in parts of eastern South Africa Monday night into Tuesday.

Durban was one of the hardest-hit areas with more than 150 mm (6 inches) falling on the city within a 12-hour period. Normal rainfall for the entire month of April is only around 90 mm (3.5 inches).

Acting KwaZulu-Natal Premier Sihle Zikalala said that the death toll due to flooding and mudslides in the province rose to 70, according to CNN.

SA Satellite 4/23

Satellite image showing the storm system that brought deadly flooding to Durban, South Africa on Tuesday, April 23.


The number of deaths may continue to rise as rescue crews work to dig through debris from mudslides and floodwaters continue to surge through the area.

The flooding resulted in damaged homes, collapsed walls and mudslides across the Durban area.


More than 2,000 emergency calls have been placed since Monday night, and numerous power outages have been reported.

The combination of flooding and rough seas has also caused extensive beach damage.

AP Durban 4/24

Rescue workers search for victims in a collapsed building near Durban, South Africa, Tuesday, April 23, 2019. (AP Photo)


Fortunately, flooding downpours are no longer expected for Durban.

RELATED:
South Africa Weather Center
Interactive South Africa weather satellite
Detailed Durban, South Africa weather forecast

Dry weather is expected to dominate from Friday into this weekend. Any shower that grazes the area will be light and only last for a brief time.

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