Get AccuWeather alerts right in your browser!
Enable Notifications
Excessive Heat Warning
...EXCESSIVE HEAT WARNING REMAINS IN ...

Severe storms unleash high winds, very large hail in south-central US

By Brian Lada, AccuWeather meteorologist and staff writer
By Chaffin Mitchell, AccuWeather staff writer
June 20, 2019, 6:43:57 AM EDT


Damaging storms erupted across the south-central United States on Wednesday as another round of severe weather targeted the region.

Severe storms first developed in the mid-Mississippi Valley, rumbling from southeastern Missouri into southern Indiana. Wind gusts up to 45 mph and quarter-sized hail were seen with some of the stronger storms near Cape Girardeau, Missouri and Paducah, Kentucky, but no major damage was reported.

The focal point for severe storms eventually shifted farther south to Texas, Arkansas and Mississippi.

More than 100,000 customers were without power in Arkansas during the height of the storms, according to Poweroutage.us.

Download the free AccuWeather app to receive severe weather and tornado watches and warnings. Keep checking back for updates on AccuWeather.com and stay tuned to the AccuWeather Network on DirecTV, Frontier and Verizon Fios.

RELATED:
The difference between tornado watches and warnings
Is it safe to talk on your cell phone during a thunderstorm?
'I started shaking:' New homeowner rushes family to storm shelter as tornado bears down

Read below to view previous real-time storm reports of the severe weather coverage.


12:35 a.m. CDT Thursday:

The storms across the South Central states are unleashing a large amount of rainfall, with flash flooding being reported in parts of northeast Texas.

Several roads are closed and swift water rescues have been performed in the city of Sulphur Springs, according to local law enforcement.

In nearby Greenville, emergency managers report nearly 3 feet of water along Joe Ramsey Boulevard.


12:00 a.m. CDT Thursday:

A wind gust of 66 mph was reported in Memphis, Tennessee, as an intense line of thunderstorms blew through.


10:55 p.m. CDT Wednesday:

As the risk of severe storms continues overnight, two new severe thunderstorm watches have been issued by the National Weather Service.

One of the watches includes College Station, Texas and Monroe, Louisiana, and is in effect until 6 a.m. CDT Thursday.

The other watch includes much of southwestern Tennessee, northern and central Mississippi and northern and central Alabama.


Meanwhile, the severe storms that blasted through Arkansas in the past few hours have left over 100,000 people without power, according to poweroutage.us.


10:10 p.m. CDT Wednesday:

There are numerous reports of downed trees and power lines in Little Rock, Arkansas, after severe storms swept through with wind gusts as high as 70 mph.

Screen Shot 2019-06-19 at 11.09.39 PM.png



8:22 p.m. CDT Wednesday:

Images below show damage to power lines, buildings, and trees in Greenville, Texas following a possible tornado.



7:50 p.m. CDT Wednesday:

There are reports of quarter to half-dollar size hail in the Brentwood, Tennessee area.

Severe winds of 50-60 mph are likely in the areas of Brentwood, Nolensville, and La Vergne near Nashville, Tennesee during the next 30 minutes. Tree damage and power outages are possible.



6:45 p.m. CDT Wednesday:

There is a likely tornado in southeast Oklahoma about to cross into southwest Arkansas. The storm is heading toward Horatio and Winthrop, Arkansas. If you are near this area, take cover now.



5:55 p.m. CDT Wednesday:

Damage has been reported after a possible tornado was on the ground in Greenville, Texas.



5:00 p.m. CDT Wednesday:

Walt Disney World in Florida is currently under a Tornado Warning.


3:55 p.m. CDT Wednesday:

A tornado watch has been issued for part of the south-central U.S., and will remain into effect until midnight. In addition to tornadoes, very large hail and wind gusts up to 80 mph will be possible.

tor watch tx

Report a Typo

Comments

Comments that don't add to the conversation may be automatically or manually removed by Facebook or AccuWeather. Profanity, personal attacks, and spam will not be tolerated.

More Weather News