Dozens dead as deadly flooding strikes Japan

By Kristina Pydynowski, AccuWeather senior meteorologist
July 09, 2018, 1:24:09 AM EDT

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At least 100 people are dead, dozens others missing and millions forced from their homes as major and historic flooding struck Japan.

Across the country, evacuation orders or advisories were sent to 4.72 million people, according to the Associated Press. Rounds of heavy rain triggered widespread major flooding across western and central Japan.

The extensive flooding has claimed the lives of at least 100 people, according to the Chicago Tribune.

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The severe flooding resulted as tropical moisture streamed across Japan following the departure of Typhoon Prapiroon, unloading rounds of heavy rain.

Kobe received 215 mm (8.46 inches) of rain from Thursday to Sunday; 362 mm (14.26 inches) of rain fell in Fukuyama. Totals during the same amount of time also topped 300 mm (a foot) in Iizuka.


The rain shattered records ranging from 1-hour amounts to three-day totals.

The 84.5 mm (3.33 inches) that poured down in 1 hour on Friday in Ureshino broke the previous 1-hour rain record from June 19, 2008. Mt. Ontakeyama in Nagano Prefecture topped the new records list for three-day rainfall totals with 655.5 mm (25.81 inches).

While the worst of the rainfall is over, rounds of showers and thunderstorms will continue to impact southern parts of the country, threatening to worsen ongoing flooding and slow recovery efforts.

Remember to never drive or walk through a flooded road to avoid a potentially deadly situation. The road underneath may be damaged or the current of the water can quickly sweep you or your vehicle away.

Downpours are expected to lessen into early this week as attention turns toward Super Typhoon Maria threatening the Ryukyu Islands.

Even as the rain eases, rivers can continue to rise and inundate neighboring land and homes.

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