Earthquake rattles Japan, killing at least 4 and injuring hundreds

By Faith Eherts, AccuWeather meteorologist
By Eric Leister, AccuWeather senior meteorologist
June 19, 2018, 4:02:51 AM EDT


A magnitude 6.1 earthquake rattled Japan early on Monday morning near the major metropolitan area of Osaka, injuring hundreds and leaving at least four dead, according to the Japan Times.

The earthquake struck at a relatively shallow depth of 13 kilometers (8.1 miles) just northeast of Osaka in the Kansai region, and since it occurred at an inland location, no tsunami occurred.

Japan Earthquake 6/18

A crack is filled with water on a road after water pipes were broken following an earthquake in Takatsuki city, Osaka, western Japan, Monday, June 18, 2018. (Keiji Uesho/Kyodo News via AP)


Trains and subways across the region were stopped, including the bullet train that runs between Osaka and Tokyo. According to Kansai Electric Power Company, more than 170,000 homes were without power around 9:50 a.m JST.

Both Kansai International Airport and Kobe Airport were closed temporarily following the quake, but resumed services after inspections for damage.

Subway services were gradually increased throughout the morning and returned to normal schedules during the afternoon.

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As of 1p.m. JST, there were over 300 reported injuries, according to Japan's Fire and Disaster Management Agency. Four deaths have been confirmed.

Little damage to infrastructure has been reported in this industrial region of Japan, but the Agency stresses that strong aftershocks are possible over the coming days.

A period of heavy rain is expected to overspread the Osaka area from Tuesday into Wednesday. The heaviest rainfall is expected Tuesday night into Wednesday and could result in flooding and an elevated risk for mudslides following the recent earthquake and any potential aftershocks.

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