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China Heat Wave on Track to Shatter More Records

By By Jim Andrews, AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist
August 04, 2013, 3:51:59 PM EDT

At least two people have died in Shanghai as vast areas of China swelter in a stubborn midsummer heat wave.

A "level two" heat wave response for much of eastern China was triggered for the first time on Tuesday, the Xinhuanet website said. According to the China Meteorological Administration, a level two heat wave is characterized by temperatures over 37 degrees C (99 degrees F).

Along with the two heat stroke victims, thousands of people sought help in Shanghai area hospitals.

Shanghai reached 38 degrees C (at least 100 degrees F) on Wednesday, the last day of July, and Thursday, the first day of August so we are now up to nine days in a row of at least 38-degree-C (at least 100-degrees-F) heat.

July ended with 25 days reaching at least 35 degrees C (95 degrees F).

For the month of July, the average temperature in Shanghai was 32.1 degrees C (89.8 degrees F), or 4.2 degrees C (7.6 degrees F) above normal, according to weather data accessed by AccuWeather.com.

Unfortunately, there is absolutely no heat relief for all of next week, with severe heat poised to grip Shanghai and a wide area of eastern China well into the first half of August, forecast tools available to AccuWeather.com show.

Daily temperatures will reach 35 to 41 degrees C (about 95 to 106 degrees F) in Shanghai and other areas. So it looks like August may average well above normal as well.

Persistent subtropical high pressure over eastern China has shifted summer rains northward, leaving Shanghai and much of eastern China baking hot. What is more, aside from Typhoon Soulik, which landed with heavy rain early in July, the region has been without tropical storms this month.

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