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Death toll continues to rise in Mexico following country's strongest earthquake in a century

By Courtney Barrow, AccuWeather staff writer
By Courtney Spamer, AccuWeather meteorologist
September 13, 2017, 7:54:18 AM EDT


An 8.1-magnitude earthquake shook Mexico and Guatemala late Thursday night, according to the United States Geological Survey. The quake struck off the coast of Chiapas, a state in the southern part of the country.

At least 96 people are dead in the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Tabasco, according to the Reuters.

Mexico's National Seismological Service believes the quake could have killed about 400 people.

The USGS says there have been more than 30 aftershocks, ranging from 4.2 to 5.7 in magnitude. A bigger one of magnitude 5.0 shook the area Monday morning.


APMexicoFlag

Soldiers remove debris from a partly collapsed municipal building felled by a massive earthquake in Juchitan, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Friday, Sept. 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Luis Alberto Cruz)

The president of Mexico, Enrique Pena Nieto says the earthquake is the strongest the country has seen in a century. He added that 200,000 remain without power, after initially 1 million lost electricity. The quake caused extensive damage as buildings in southern Mexico collapsed.

NOAA reported a tsunami off the coast of Mexico after the quake struck. The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said tsunami waves as high as 1 meter or 3.3 feet have been observed in Mexico.

Several states in Mexico closed schools on Friday, so that the structural integrity of buildings can be assessed.

APMexicoBike

Residents drive by a collapsed building felled by a massive earthquake, in Juchitan, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Friday, Sept. 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Luis Alberto Cruz)

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USGS earthquake map
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Different parts of the world are reporting feeling the effects of the quake, in places like Mexico City; Austin, Texas, and Washington state.

Damage was done to the facade of buildings in Villahermosa, over 320 km (200 miles) away from the epicenter.

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