WeatherMatrix (Jesse Ferrell)

Rare Subtropical Cyclone Near Brazil Coast

By Jesse Ferrell, Meteorologist/Community Director
3/10/2010, 3:52:25 AM

UPDATE WEDNESDAY: MetSul.com (you can translate automatically to English with Google Toolbar) is continuing to issue breaking weather updates with new satellite images. They are calling the system a Tropical Cyclone this morning while we are awaiting NOAA's update.

A subtropical cyclone, one of only 6 in recorded history, is affecting southeast Brazil today. There is some argument as to whether or not it has or will come on shore (see below) but it is causing high waves, winds and heavy rain. Below is a visible satellite from late this morning courtesy NOAA (alternate view):


3-9-2010_3-15-53_PM

NOAA'S HPC says:

"A SUBTROPICAL CYCLONE LIES OFF THE SOUTHERN COAST OF BRASIL...WITH AN ESTIMATED MINIMAL CENTRAL PRESSURE OF 1003 HPA...AND MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS OF 25-34KT. DEEP CONVECTION IS WRAPPING AROUND THE CLOSED CIRCULATION...AND WITH SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURES OF 26C...THIS SYSTEM MIGHT MAKE THE TRANSITION TO A TROPICAL CYCLONE LATER THIS EVENING/EARLY MORNING HOURS. THE LOW LEVEL CIRCULATION...HOWEVER...WILL REMAIN NEARLY STATIONARY WHILE MEANDERING OFF THE COAST OF BRASIL THROUGH 48-54 HRS"

Here is a high-res visible satellite shot from earlier this morning courtesy the Navy. The only buoy in the area is not transmitting wind or wave observations but the WaveWatch model indicates (see above) that waves are over 18 feet offshore and a foot onshore.


wave309as

Metsul.com says (translation provided by Google Toolbar):

"It was evening now featured in television news: "cyclone reaches the coast tonight." Not enough, is already on the coast. The image of a cyclone to the coast during the night, for those who live on the North Shore refers to the memory of the night of 27 to 28 March 2004, when Catarina touched the ground. This will not be a night of Catarina. The subtropical cyclone is not even a very deep system, which means less potential to bring severe weather. We're talking about a low of more than 1000 hPa and Catherine now had 970 hPa. The subtropical cyclone... originated from a low pressure system off the coast of the Southeast. The coastline may have maximum gusts, on average, 50 to 80 km / h, occasionally higher in the next 24 hours, but in the open sea, the greater distance from the coast, is that the wind should be stronger gusts that could exceed 100 km/h (62 mph)."

As MetSul points out above, this is nothing compared to the much-stronger Cyclone Catarina of 2004. You can see pictures of the waves on MetSul's site.

ATTN. PREMIUM & PRO MEMBERS: VIEW & POST COMMENTS HERE
The views expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of AccuWeather, Inc. or AccuWeather.com

Comments

Comments that don't add to the conversation may be automatically or manually removed by Facebook or AccuWeather. Profanity, personal attacks, and spam will not be tolerated.

WeatherMatrix (Jesse Ferrell)