Global climate change

On Pace to be the Warmest Year on Record

11/14/2014, 5:21:43 AM

NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) has finally released their October 2014 global surface temperature anomaly data.

According to GISS, October 2014 ended up tied for warmest on record globally with October 2005. The combined land/ocean temperature anomaly for last month was +0.76 degrees C.

GISS global temperature anomalies for October 2014.

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October 2014 was also the second warmest October for land/ocean surface combined in the Southern Hemisphere. October 2012 is still the warmest on record, according to GISS.

For global land masses only, October 2014 tied October 2005 as the warmest on record globally with a temperature anomaly of +1.00 degrees C.

For the January to October 2014 period (land/ocean combined), the globe is averaging +0.66 degrees C., which puts this year on pace to at least tie for the warmest year on record in the GISS database, which goes back to 1880.

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Satellite measured temperature data for October 2014

Remote Sensing Systems (RSS), which measures the temperatures of the lower troposphere using microwave sounding units on board satellites indicates that October 2014 was the 9th warmest October in the satellite measured record that goes back to 1979. RSS does not include temperature analysis below 70 degrees south latitude and above 82.5 north latitude. The RSS temperatures are also measured against a 1981-2010 baseline, while the GISS temperatures are measured against at 1951-1980 baseline, which partly explains the significant difference we see in the anomalies.

According to RSS, the October 2014 global temperature anomaly was +.272 degrees C.

The RSS Northern Hemispheric temperature anomalies for October 2014 (Images courtesy of RSS)

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The RSS Southern Hemispheric temperature anomalies for October 2014

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For additional information on the comparison of temperature datasets you can read an excellent post from Tamino, which was written back in 2010.

The views expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of AccuWeather, Inc. or AccuWeather.com

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Global climate change