Tropical Storm Rafael Forms in the Carribean

By , Expert Senior Meteorologist
October 13, 2012; 5:55 AM
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The 17th named storm of the season developed in the western Caribbean Friday evening, becoming Rafael with winds sustained at 40 mph.

Rafael will continue to churn through the western Caribbean and affect the US and British Virgin Islands today.

The main threats will be gusty winds, soaking downpours and rough seas.

Some of the hardest hit spots will see anywhere from 2-4 inches of rain, with localized locations up to 10 inches possible.

This sort of rain will be capable of causing mudslides, rockslides and flash flooding.

As Rafael heads through the Virgin Islands and dances with the western-half of Puerto Rico, he will head north toward Bermuda by the early to middle part of next week.

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