WATCH: Boaters Panic as Giant Iceberg Collapses, Induces Massive Wave

By Kristen Rodman, AccuWeather.com Staff Writer
July 31, 2014; 3:08 AM ET
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In the icy waters of the Bay of Exploits in northern Newfoundland, a Canadian couple on a boat ride on July 24, 2014, were put in a dangerous situation as one of the region's massive icebergs suddenly crumbled.

As large chunks of the iceberg collapsed into the water, an enormous wave rippled from the site and moved out into the open water.

Only miles from the boat and in a panic, the couple sped up in an attempt to avoid the colossal waves.

Famously known as the source behind the sinking of the RMS Titanic in the North Atlantic Ocean on April 15, 1912, icebergs can prove to be some of the most menacing threats in the ocean for ships and sailors.

A huge iceberg can be seen from a tourist boat on Nov. 15, 2006, in Argentina. (Photo/Quim Pagans)

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Despite their size noticeable to the naked eye, the majority of icebergs are actually underwater, with nearly 90 percent of their total mass under the sea, according to the Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism.

Although the number of icebergs varies year to year, on average there are 15,000 icebergs born annually.


Have questions, comments, or a story to share? Email Kristen Rodman at Kristen.Rodman@accuweather.com or follow her on Twitter @Accu_Kristen. Follow us @breakingweather, or on Facebook and Google+.

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