Warm Weather Around Pittsburgh to Last Into The Weekend

By , Expert Senior Meteorologist
October 04, 2013; 2:06 AM
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Warm weather will continue around the Pittsburgh area into the weekend.

A zone of high pressure will continue to hover around the Atlantic Seaboard keeping the atmosphere generally dry and is forecast to keep the warmth coming.

The pattern will be favorable for outdoor plans and construction projects most of the time. However, there is the chance of a pop-up thunderstorm Thursday night.

High temperatures will be in the lower 80s with nighttime lows in the lower 60s through Saturday.

For fans heading to St. Louis for game one of the series Thursday between the Cardinals and Pirates, there will be shower and thunderstorm activity in the area with warm and humid conditions.

The only potential significant travel problem will be patchy morning fog for commuters.

RELATED:
Pittsburgh Local Forecast
Interactive Pennsylvania/Ohio Weather Radar
St. Louis Area Forecast

A weak system will produce spotty showers over the eastern Great Lakes Thursday. Spotty shower activity is possible around western Pennsylvania and northern West Virginia Thursday night into Friday.

It may not be until Sunday when a cold front from the Midwest and perhaps a tropical system from the Gulf of Mexico combine forces to bring the next chance of rain to the Pittsburgh area and the Appalachians.

Until then, temperatures will continue to average well above normal and most areas will have little or no rainfall.

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