Violent Thunderstorms Still on Tap for Chicago

By , Senior Meteorologist
October 13, 2012; 1:44 PM
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Today started on a rainy note for Chicago, but powerful thunderstorms will still threaten the "Windy City" before this weekend comes to a close.

While occasional rain and less-intense thunderstorms first continue to wet Chicago into this evening, late tonight into the first half of Sunday is when a couple rounds of violent thunderstorms will target the city.

The strongest thunderstorms will be capable of unleashing damaging winds, flooding downpours and frequent lightning.

The impending violent thunderstorms will be part of a widespread severe weather event, which is expected to stretch back into central Texas.

Warmer air surging into Chicago will help fuel the powerful thunderstorms.

Temperatures will continue rising into the 60s through this evening, then will not fall back into the 50s until late Sunday. A low in the middle 40s is more common for Chicago this time of year.

Howling non-thunderstorm winds will add to Chicago's weather woes on Sunday. Winds between 15 and 30 mph will whip through the city with gusts to 40 mph.

An end to the windy and rainy weather will come Sunday night as the potent storm departs. High pressure will quickly replace the storm on Monday, meaning umbrellas will not be needed as residents head back to work and school.

Caption photo provided by Photos.com.

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