AccuWeather Announces New Partnership With USA Today

September 17, 2012; 4:30 AM ET
Share |

AccuWeather announced a new content relationship with USA TODAY that will debut with an AccuWeather-provided weather page. The release of the new weather pages coincides with USA TODAY's 30th anniversary.

AccuWeather's content will soon extend across USA TODAY products, including USATODAY.com and USA TODAY digital platforms such as its industry-leading mobile phone and tablet apps.

"USA TODAY's Weather page broke new ground for its unique look when it debuted 30 years ago and remains an integral part of who we are today," USA TODAY Editor-in-Chief Dave Callaway said. "On our 30th anniversary, we have planned major enhancements to our weather offerings on all USA TODAY platforms and working with AccuWeather signifies our continued commitment to providing the best weather forecasts to our readers."

USA TODAY's print newspaper, with a readership of 3.1 million, will offer AccuWeather's trusted content with the most accurate, localized, up-to-date weather information, designed in consultation with AccuWeather. In addition to the colorful national weather forecast map, the page will also feature three-day forecasts for dozens of U.S. cities, detail where flight delays are possible, and display national rain and snow forecast maps for the next four days.

"We are pleased that USA TODAY has partnered with AccuWeather for the highly accurate and authoritative weather content we provide," Barry Myers, CEO of AccuWeather, said. "The newly redesigned weather presentations will provide all of the relevant weather content that readers of USA TODAY need to plan their daily lives."

Comments

Comments left here should adhere to the AccuWeather.com Community Guidelines. Profanity, personal attacks, and spam will not be tolerated.

More Weather News

Daily U.S. Extremes

past 24 hours

  Extreme Location
High N/A
Low N/A
Precip N/A

WeatherWhys®

This Day In Weather History

New England (1785)
Four day rains put Merrimac River in NH and MA to greatest flood height ever known -- extensive bridge and mill damage.

Mid-Atlantic Coast (1878)
Hurricane did extensive damage in NC, VA, MD, NJ and PA. "Philadelphia's worst" -- 84 mph wind gust at Cape May, NJ; 28.82" pressure at Annapolis, MD.

Bar Harbor, ME (1947)
Wind-driven forest fires destroyed homes and medical research institute. 17 died; $30 million damage.