Another Round of Snow for Minneapolis, Upper Midwest

By , Meteorologist
December 9, 2012; 5:32 AM ET
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After a round of light snow across southern Minnesota late Friday, a second and more significant round of snow is in store across Minnesota for tonight into Sunday.

A coating to an inch of snow fell across southern Minnesota, including in Minneapolis, with the first round Friday afternoon into Friday night.

It was a "wet, sloppy snow" and more of a "nuisance snow," according to AccuWeather Expert Senior Meteorologist Brian Wimer.

As a more potent storm slides from the Rockies into the northern Plains on today, heavier snow will fall along the northern and western edge of the storm.

Snow will move into Minnesota tonight into Sunday from the second storm. Accumulations are predicted to be 3-6 inches in Minneapolis.

"Winds will kick up on Sunday and there might be blowing and drifting snow," Wimer said.

Flight delays may be possible at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport on Sunday due to snow, low visibility and wind.

Areas farther north and northeast of Minneapolis may receive even more snow; 6-12 inches of snow is forecast for north-central portions of Minnesota, northwestern Wisconsin and portions of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Thumbnail image of Minneapolis skyline from Photos.com.

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