Atlantic Active with Hurricane Kirk, Tropical Storm Leslie

By , Meteorologist
August 31, 2012; 10:31 AM ET
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Kirk remains a hurricane, while Tropical Storm Leslie will require an even closer watch in the coming days.

Kirk became organized enough to be named a tropical storm in the central Atlantic on late Tuesday night. Since Kirk has been named, the storm has continued to strengthen while tracking over warm water with favorable environmental conditions.

That trend will continue with Kirk forecast to travel through an environment of little wind shear and limited dry air. It is possible that Kirk could strengthen into a major hurricane later today or at the very least maintain its strength as a Category 2 storm.

Satellite loop of Kirk from NOAA.

Kirk is turning to the northeast into the weekend, keeping the storm away from any land over the next several days. However, there are implications for Europe's weather.

Some of Kirk's moisture may get absorbed into a storm that can lead to heavy rain across Ireland, Scotland and Norway early next week, AccuWeather Expert Senior Meteorologist Jason Nicholls said.

Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Leslie formed farther south in the central Atlantic on Thursday. The system has become organized rather quickly with favorable conditions in place.

Continued strengthening is likely over the next several days as Leslie tracks over increasingly warm waters and through an environment with low shear and minimal dry air. Meteorologists anticipate Leslie to become a hurricane by the weekend.

Steering flow to the west-northwest could bring this next system north of the northern Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico by Labor Day weekend.

Bermuda and interests along the East Coast of the U.S. should monitor Leslie closely.

Meteorologist Matt Alto contributed to the content of this story.


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