Carlotta to Bring Flooding, Mudslides to Mexico

June 16, 2012; 5:15 AM ET
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Carlotta made landfall near Puerto Escondido, Mexico, late Friday night while unleashing feet of rain in mountainous areas and leading to disastrous flooding and mudslides.

The AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center has the latest statistics on Carlotta.

At the time of landfall, wind gusts were estimated to be around 90 mph near the storm's center.

Conditions appear ripe for further intensification as Carlotta churns northwestward through the eastern Pacific.

RELATED: Carlotta Could Mean Trouble Will Brew in the Gulf of Mexico

The stretch of coastline at greatest risk this weekend spans Puerto Angel to Acapulco.

Life-threatening flooding is expected to be the Carlotta's biggest impact. Feet of rain are possible for the mountains of Oaxaca, Mexico, as upslope flow enhances rainfall. At least a portion of the storm will linger across the region, allowing a deluge to last for days.

Landslides and mudslides could occur in higher elevations along with significant flooding.

While the strongest winds will stay offshore, damaging winds are still a possibility. Peak storm surge over 6 feet is possible along the Oaxaca coastline and battering surf are threats as well.

As Carlotta brushes the coastline and surf kicks up, coastal flooding is also a possibility.

Stay with AccuWeather.com for updates on this system.

Content contributed by AccuWeather.com Meteorologists Bill Deger and Matt Alto.
Thumbnail photo of Tropical Storm Alex from Flickr user Globovisión

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