New Atlantic Tropical Depression May Take Shape

By Brian Edwards, Meteorologist
August 20, 2012; 6:50 PM ET
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Photo courtesy of Photos.com.

It is not just Hurricane Gordon roaming the Atlantic; a new tropical depression may take shape in the near future.

Hurricane Gordon, the strongest tropical system so far in the Atlantic Basin this year, is slamming the Azores with hurricane-force winds and heavy rain this morning.

As we continue to trek toward the all important peak of hurricane season which occurs on Sept. 10, the basin appears to be showing signs of remaining active at least for the next week or two.

A new tropical wave which came off Africa last Thursday continues to track through the central Atlantic in between the Cape Verde Islands and the Lesser Antilles.

The wave has become better organized through the weekend, a trend the AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center expects will continue with a new tropical depression taking shape in the next 24 hours or so.

If additional strengthening follows, the wave would acquire the name Tropical Storm Isaac.

The next question becomes, where would this feature go should it develop?

Most of the forecast models at this point take this feature westward to the Lesser Antilles through midweek. Whether or not it then takes a turn toward the Bahamas or continues through the Caribbean to Central America or the Gulf of Mexico remains to be seen.

The bottom line is that the tropics are active and our meteorologists expect them to remain quite active at least through the end of the month.

A cluster of showers and thunderstorms over the southwestern Gulf of Mexico further proves that point.

It is not out of the question that this cluster eventually organizes into a tropical depression in the upcoming days, in a fashion similar to how Tropical Storm Helene took shape.

Regardless of development, heavy rain accompanying this feature threatens to trigger flooding along the eastern coastline of mainland Mexico.

AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Kristina Pydynowski contributed to the content of this story.

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