Snow, Cold Dives Into Great Lakes and Northeast

By Courtney Spamer, Meteorologist
January 18, 2014; 4:09 AM ET
Share |
Play video Click the above video for a detailed look at the forecast.

The second in a round of clipper systems is expected to bring snow to the northeastern tier of the country into Friday night.

A low in northern Michigan early Friday will dive south and eastward into the eastern Great Lakes and Northeast, before potentially causing a snowstorm in the Northeast by the weekend.

This weak system is not expected to bring a substantial amount of snow across the Great Lakes or Northeast, but even just a light covering could mean slippery travel.

As of Thursday evening, nearly four inches of snow fell on Marion, Ind., according to a trained spotter. In Leipsic, Ohio, 2.5 inches also fell.

The storm moved further east Friday morning and brought snow to the interior Northeast, including Pittsburgh and Buffalo during the day.

In addition to slick surfaces will be cold air and bitter winds behind the lead of the storm.

Travel delays could also result in the Midwest and Ohio Valey from strong winds creating poor visibility and extensive blowing and drifting snow. Winds will be blowing steady around 25 mph in some areas, with locally gusty winds topping 50 mph. The wind can be locally damaging, causing flight delays through Friday.

Already by Thursday night, more than 900 flights were delayed or cancelled at Chicago O'Hare International Airport, according to FlightStats. Other airports experiencing delays or cancellations on Thursday were the Minneapolis-St. Paul International, the Sioux Falls Regional and the Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County airports.

The strongest winds on Thursday were in the northern Plains and Upper Midwest, affecting I-29 through the Dakotas and western Iowa and parts of I-90 and I-94.

During Thursday afternoon, a 22 car pileup occurred along I-90, west of Sioux Falls, S.D., according to the Sioux Falls National Weather Service office.

The gusty winds will be highest downwind of the Great Lakes on Friday, but could still be strong enough to cause some low visibilities along I-80 from Chicago to central Pennsylvania and along I-90 east of Lake Erie.

A piece of the polar vortex will drop down into the United States, creating plummeting temperatures.

After having frigid low temperatures Thursday night in Minneapolis, with AccuWeather RealFeel® near minus 20, highs on Friday will only reach the single digits.

Wind gusts will have the AccuWeather RealFeel® in the single digits at times for Detroit on Friday.

RELATED:
Active Pattern Could Yield Northeast Snowstorm
Polar Vortex Piece Brings New Surge of Cold
Black Ice and How to Spot This Driving Danger

AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Brian Thompson said "the cold will not be nearly as bitter as the cold wave that smashed records in places early last week."

This cold surge will instead have a shorter duration and will not be as extreme. However, temperatures will still drop below zero across Minnesota and Wisconsin.

This wave of cold will be one of many in the coming weeks as an active pattern continues across the Great Lakes.

Comments

Comments left here should adhere to the AccuWeather.com Community Guidelines. Profanity, personal attacks, and spam will not be tolerated.

More Weather News

  • Late-Week Storm to Target Southern Europe

    January 30, 2015; 7:50 AM ET

    The same storm opening the door for snow showers to stream across the United Kingdom and Ireland will impact southern Europe late in the week.

Loading...

Daily U.S. Extremes

past 24 hours

  Extreme Location
High N/A
Low N/A
Precip N/A

WeatherWhys®

This Day In Weather History

Butte, MT (1997)
133 mph wind gusts.

Syracuse, NY (1927)
Great snowstorm in central NY set modern marks; 27 inches at Syracuse.

Birmingham, AL (1936)
11.0 inches of snow.