Summery Weekend in Store for DC

By , Senior Meteorologist
August 30, 2014; 4:34 AM ET
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After a break from steamy air, hot and humid weather will bounce back in Washington, D.C., during the Labor Day weekend.

High temperatures around the region will soar well into the 80s on Saturday before surpassing the 90-degree mark Sunday and Labor Day.

An increase in humidity will contribute to dangerously hotter RealFeel® temperatures.

For people heading to the beach, surf conditions will be much better than recent days on Saturday as Cristobal departs. However, an increase in winds at the coast will stir up surf some for a time on Sunday.

Much of the time will be free of rain this weekend. However, there will be spotty showers and thunderstorms popping up in the building warmth and humidity. Some neighborhoods could be thoroughly drenched by a downpour.

The afternoon hours will be the most active time each day of the holiday weekend.

Detailed Washington, D.C. Forecast
Washington, D.C. Interactive Weather Radar MinuteCast™ for Washington, D.C.

Indications are that there will be more warm, rather than cool, days through the middle of September, which will be a bit of a switch from most of the summer.


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