Derecho, Tornado Risk Chicago to Detroit Monday Night

By Brian Lada, Meteorologist
June 30, 2014; 9:19 PM ET
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Play video An expert analysis on the severe weather is given in the above AccuWeather.com video.

Severe weather, including the risk of damaging straight-line winds and tornadoes will extend from the central Plains to the Midwest into Monday night, creating a significant danger to lives and property.

Thunderstorms wasted no time become severe over portions of Nebraska and Iowa Monday morning.

This severe weather outbreak will continue to progress eastward Monday night, it will extend across the metropolitan areas of Des Moines, Iowa; Kansas City and St. Louis, Missouri; Madison and Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Chicago and Peoria, Illinois; South Bend, Indiana; and Lansing and Detroit, Michigan.

According to Severe Weather Expert Henry Margusity, "The complex of severe thunderstorms over western Iowa and eastern Nebraska Monday morning was expanding and evolving into a derecho and is likely to cover hundreds of miles in the Midwest before breaking down Tuesday morning."

In addition to risk of the tornadoes and damaging winds into Monday night, the strongest thunderstorms will produce large hail, flooding downpours and frequent lightning strikes.

The storms will down trees, produce power outages and can cause extensive property damage along the way.

According to Senior Meteorologist Frank Strait, "The danger should transition into more of a widespread damaging wind threat for areas farther to the east and south into Illinois, Missouri, northern Indiana and Michigan Monday night."

There will still be a risk of isolated tornadoes.

For Chicago, the violent thunderstorms with a sudden rush of wind, torrential rain, hail and an isolated tornado will roll through on Monday evening.

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Around Detroit, the risk of damaging and disruptive storms will be late Monday night into around daybreak on Tuesday.

"There may be damaging storms from the same complex rolling right along into early Tuesday morning in part of southwest Ontario," Margusity said.

During Tuesday midday, afternoon and evening, the severe weather danger will shift to places around Lake Erie and the Ohio Valley and will stretch back to the middle Mississippi Valley.

While the storms overall later Tuesday may not be as intense as those into Monday night, there will still be the risk of damage and disruptions to travel.

The timing of these storms can lead to high impacts around the major travel hubs in the Midwest on through Tuesday.

Evening commutes can turn treacherous as torrential downpours significantly reduce visibility for those driving on the roadways, as well as increase the risk of hydroplaning.

Those headed to the airports should also prepare for delays not only because of the extreme weather, but also the higher volume of travelers for the Independence Day week.

As storms roll through, temporary ground stops may be put in place at major airports such as O'Hare International in Chicago.

Wind gusts associated with the storms will also lead to power outages and property damage as they are expected to be strong enough to blow over trees and power poles.

Looking ahead to Wednesday, showers and thunderstorms are in the forecast for much of the Northeast as the storm system continues to shift eastward.

However, severe weather on Wednesday is not expected to be as widespread as Monday and Tuesday as the system responsible for the thunderstorms weakens.

Soaking downpours will still be possible which can lead to urban flooding.

The weather along the Atlantic coast Thursday into Friday is dependent on the track and strength of a budding tropical system near Florida.

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