Severe Weather Threatened Texas Saturday Night

By Brian Edwards, Meteorologist
March 10, 2013; 5:19 AM ET
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A potent storm will tap into a warm, moist airmass, helping to ignite strong to severe thunderstorms.

The same storm system which created blizzard conditions near Denver, Colo., sparked a round of severe weather Saturday night across the southern Plains.

As AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Anthony Sagliani warned earlier in the week, "Hail the size of quarters, ping pong balls or even tennis balls are possible with any of these storms, which can easily break windows, smash windshields and injure unsheltered livestock."

Widespread low clouds and drizzle across Texas and Oklahoma prevented thunderstorms from developing earlier on Saturday.

Therefore, it took some heating stirs up the atmosphere later in the afternoon to cause storms to initially fire from near Oklahoma City, Okla., through Abilene, Texas.

Storms expanded into the evening farther south and east, affecting residents from Tulsa, Okla., through Dallas, Waco, Austin and San Antonio, Texas.

Thunderstorms produced dangerous hail mentioned above along with wind gusts to 60 mph, which can easily down small trees and power lines.

While an isolated tornado was also possible, especially across southeastern Oklahoma and northeastern Texas, there were no reports through early Sunday morning.

Thunderstorms remained severe through the overnight hours before transitioning into more of a heavy rain event over far southeastern Oklahoma and eastern Texas.

Farther to the north, AccuWeather.com meteorologists were concerned for isolated severe weather Saturday afternoon and evening across north-central Kansas and a small part of southern Nebraska, including the city of McCook.

This separate area of thunderstorms develop with some daytime heating underneath the primary low pressure center.

However, while there were some thunderstorms scattered across the state in the afternoon, no severe weather was reported.

As always, residents are urged to keep an eye to the sky during potential severe events. Heed all watches and warnings which are issued and check back with AccuWeather.com as we continue to monitor the severe weather.

Check out our Severe Weather Center for the latest travel maps as well as watches and warnings.

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