Northeast at Risk for Severe Storms, Flash Flooding Next Week

By , AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist
July 12, 2014; 3:22 AM ET
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As a surge of cool air expands over the Midwest early next week, there is the potential for an outbreak of severe weather and flash flooding in the Northeast spanning multiple days.

Portions of the Northeast have been the target of severe weather recently and it seems the atmosphere may send more rounds of strong, dangerous and damaging storms through the region, spanning Sunday to Tuesday.

Multiple rounds of drenching thunderstorms and the potential for severe weather will swing across the Plains and Midwest, beginning this weekend. These waves of storms will spin eastward over time.

According to AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Expert Henry Margusity, "The greatest threat to lives, homes and businesses will be high wind gusts that can down trees, bring property damage and cause power outages."

The repeating nature of the storms will cause rainfall to ramp up significantly. The forward progress of the leading edge of the cool air producing the severe weather is likely to slow upon nearing the Atlantic Seaboard at midweek.

According to AccuWeather Chief Meteorologist Elliot Abrams, "Thunderstorms early next week in the East will bring a triple threat with not only locally strong winds and frequent lightning strikes, but also the risk of flash flooding."

People traveling either a short distance to and from work or cross-country should be prepared for delays early next week. As is typically the case, the bulk of the storms will occur during the afternoon and evening but there will be some exceptions.

At this early stage, both Monday and Tuesday will bring the greatest risk of severe weather and flash flooding in the I-95 corridor, from Washington, D.C., and Richmond, Virginia, to New York City and Boston. There is a chance that torrential downpours linger along the beaches and into eastern New England through Wednesday.

In Midwest cities, the threat will be later Saturday into Sunday around Chicago and Detroit. In Cincinnati and Pittsburgh, the greatest risk will be Sunday into Monday.

RELATED:
AccuWeather.com Severe Weather Center
Storms Take Lives in the Northeast
Neoguri to Usher Cooler Air Into East for Mid-July

Significant disruptions to air travel are possible. As each wave of storms rolls through the major metro area airports, the risk of wind shear can be significant enough to aircraft to result in a ground stop.

As these waves of storms move through, they can bring windswept blinding downpours and flash flooding on a local basis, which will pose hazards for those traveling on the ground.

The pattern may also bring thunderstorms with hail in some communities and perhaps isolated tornadoes.

The details on the timing and nature of the storms will unfold over the next few days on AccuWeather.com.

According to Paul Pastelok, AccuWeather's long range expert, "The push of cool air contributing to the potential severe weather outbreak is associated with former Super Typhoon Neoguri in the Pacific Ocean curving away from mainland Asia."

The developing weather pattern for next week will result in unusually low temperature readings, both day and night, from the Midwest to the Northeast next week during what is typically the hottest part of the year.

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