Severe Storms to Threaten Chicago Saturday

By Jillian MacMath, AccuWeather.com Staff Writer
October 5, 2013; 12:12 AM ET
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After a warm, sunny start to the week in Chicago, conditions are forecast to deteriorate through the weekend.

Showers and thunderstorms arrived in the area Friday afternoon, as the week's temperature peaked at 82 degrees. Into the nighttime, warmth and humidity remained as stronger thunderstorms threatened the area.

The worst of the weather will arrive on Saturday, however, with the possibility of severe storms. Damaging winds, hail and lightning will threaten the area.

Those planning to attend high school or college football games should exercise caution, as the storms may be fast-moving and conditions can deteriorate rapidly.

RELATED:
AccuWeather.com Severe Weather Center
U.S. Forecast Temperature Maps
Chicago Radar

Accompanying the storms will be temperatures in the upper 70s throughout the day, before dropping into the lower 50s overnight.

The best opportunity for getting outside over the weekend will be on Sunday, as skies turn sunny again. The air will be noticeable cooler to end the weekend with a high of 62 forecast in the afternoon.

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