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    Rhode Island Being Battered, Not Beaten by Sandy

    By , AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist
    October 29, 2012; 3:50 AM ET
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    The latest information has the worst of Sandy aiming for New Jersey and the New York City area, but Rhode Island and southeastern New England will be battered by damaging winds, drenching rain and coastal flooding.

    The center of Sandy was roar across southern New Jersey Monday evening, but the effects continue to be far-reaching.

    Since Sandy is a large storm in terms of surface area, people should not just focus on the center for great impact and damage.

    According to AccuWeather.com's CEO Barry Myers, "Sandy is a hurricane wrapped in a winter storm."

    Winds will peak over Rhode Island during the first part of Monday night.

    Gusts of 50 to 70 mph are forecast over much of southern New England with the strongest gusts along the immediate South Coast.

    Rainfall of 1 to 2 inches is forecast over portions of southern Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island with lesser amounts farther north over New England.

    A storm surge of 4 to 8 feet is likely in southern New England and will be near record levels toward the New York City area.

    Winds will turn around to more of the southeast as Sandy moves inland Monday night and will be out of the south, but only slowly diminishing during Tuesday. As a result water levels will remain high.

    Astronomical tides will be the greatest Monday, due to the full moon.

    Even though the worst effects are likely to be centered south and west of Rhode Island, downed trees and power lines, coastal flooding, beach erosion and travel delays are to be expected.

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