Pittsburgh Getting Sandy's Cold Shoulder

By , Expert Senior Meteorologist
October 29, 2012; 5:22 AM ET
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Play video Accumulating snow of any consequence will be limited to the higher elevations. (Photos.com image)

The worst impacts from Sandy will stay east of Pittsburgh and the western slopes of the Appalachians into the Ohio Valley. However, there will be some impact in western Pennsylvania.

Folks making airline connections to the East Coast, especially from Washington, D.C. to New York City and Boston will experience storm-related delays, through midweek.

A stalled front brought cold rain to the region over this past weekend.

During the period from Monday night through Tuesday, additional rounds of rain are in store as Sandy moves inland over the mid-Atlantic and lingers. The heaviest rain locally is expected late Monday night into Tuesday morning.

Flash, urban and small stream flooding are forecast due largely to the terrain in the region and fallen leaves potentially blocking storm drains. On the eastern slopes of the Appalachians, major flooding of the Potomac River is forecast during the middle and latter part of this week.

More significant rainfall and a greater risk of flash flooding exists east of the Allegheny Front, closer to the source of tropical moisture from Sandy.

Winds from the fringe of Sandy will reach this far west. Especially so when an upper level system joins in from the west, causing winds to line up at the surface and aloft Monday night, Tuesday, perhaps into Wednesday.

Gusts between 50 and 60 mph are possible over the ridges of the mountains. Gusts between 40 and 50 mph will be occur on the west slopes of the Appalachians.

With these wind speeds, some sporadic downed trees and power outages are possible.

As for snow, there is the potential for accumulating snow in elevations above 2,200 feet in southwestern Pennsylvania and West Virginia spanning Monday night into Wednesday. A couple of feet of snow will accumulate at an elevation around 3,000 and above feet in West Virginia with blizzard conditions at times.

A couple of snow showers, mixed with rain are possible in the lower elevations spanning Tuesday into Wednesday.

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