PHOTOS: See Where Fall Colors Are Peaking in US

By Jillian MacMath, AccuWeather.com Staff Writer
October 02, 2013; 4:28 AM
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With fall underway, leaves across the country are coming into senescence, creating a vibrant landscape of reds, browns, oranges and yellows.

Entering the first week of October, much of the East has already seen slight to moderate color change. Some areas farther North, have begun to enter the peak of their season.

"It looks pretty certain that the cold temps in September brought out early and good color to the Northeast, including Pennsylvania," Marc Abrams, professor of Forest Ecology and Physiology at Penn State University, said.

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"The August drought and early frosts (in places) is a slight negative, but overall the cold temps prevailed," Abrams said.

Temperatures from September through mid-October have a significant impact on the vibrance of the displays. Cold temperatures become very important during this time, what Abrams considers the "critical period."

"The warm temps this week may delay the trees that have not yet turned but shouldn't deter the ones that have," Abrams said.

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