Perseids Meteor Shower Continues to Light the Sky

By Vickie Frantz, AccuWeather.com Staff Writer
August 13, 2012; 3:24 AM ET
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All across the U.S., astronomy fans stayed up late Saturday to catch a glimpse of the Perseids meteors streaking across the sky.

If you were one of the unlucky people who wanted to see the meteor shower but missed it, you have a second chance Sunday night and early Monday morning.

Related: Top Three Videos from the Perseid Meteor Shower

The Perseids meteors peaked during the evening of Aug. 11-12, with a viewing rate of as many as 100 meteors an hour.

Sunday night into early Monday morning, the rate will be slower with about 40 meteors an hour. The moon, waning and not very bright, will allow some of the dimmest meteors to be visible, according to Spacedex.com.

The best places to view the meteors tonight will be along the Northwest, southern Texas and along the East Coast from the Carolinas northward into Maryland.

The Perseids meteor shower is associated with the comet Swift-Tuttle. The Earth crosses the path of the comet once each year in August. Debris left by the comet (ice and dust) are then burned up by the Earth's atmosphere creating the meteor shower.

If you are able, find a safe, dark place to camp out for a few hours early morning Monday and watch the meteors streak across the sky.

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