PHOTO: Chicago Sinkhole Swallows Cars

By Jillian MacMath, AccuWeather.com Staff Writer
April 20, 2013; 2:15 PM ET
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Officials survey a gaping sinkhole that opened up a residential street on Chicago's South Side after a cast iron water main dating back to 1915 broke during a massive rain storm, Thursday, April 18, 2013, in Chicago. The hole spanned the entire width of the road and chewed up grassy areas abutting the sidewalk.(AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

As severe weather whipped across the Midwest Wednesday and Thursday, Chicago was slammed with heavy rain that wreaked havoc on the city.

A total of 5.48 inches of rain has fallen at O'Hare International Airport over 24 hours as of noon Thursday, crushing the average April total of 3.38 inches.

The 24-hour total surpassed Chicago's August average, typically the city's rainiest month, by 0.58 inches.

"The heaviest bursts of rain and thunderstorms occurred from 4 to 7 p.m. Wednesday evening and again from 1:00 a.m. to around 8:30 a.m. Thursday morning," AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Meghan Evans said.

The heavy rainfall halted travel for thousands as more than 600 total incoming and outgoing flights were canceled Thursday. Wednesday posed a similar situation with more than 200 flights delayed out of Chicago.

As water pooled on major roadways, both the Eden and Kennedy expressways were closed Thursday morning. The Dan Ryan Expressway was also flooded.

As inundation increased the travel woes across the city, the suburbs of Lombard and Gurnee called off school for the day Thursday.

Within the city, a giant sinkhole swallowed three cars.

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