NYC to Shiver, But Not Shovel Through Wednesday

By , Expert Senior Meteorologist
March 5, 2014; 12:32 AM ET
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While a major snowstorm was denied in the New York City area, that will not be the case for cold air into midweek.

After a number of March record low temperatures were set in the mid-Atlantic on Tuesday, a few daily record low temperatures may fall Wednesday morning.

Highs are forecast to be in the 30s on Wednesday and Thursday locally. The normal average high for early March is in the middle 40s.

Temperatures will slowly climb during the balance of the week with highs forecast to reach the 40s on Friday and the 50s on Saturday.

A southern storm system will be monitored for possible snow along the lower mid-Atlantic coast late Thursday into Friday morning. However, the odds are against the storm moving this far north.

According to AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Dave Dombek, "If it is any consolation to the wintry weather, Tuesday morning is likely to be the coldest morning in the area until next winter."

RELATED:
Detailed New York City Forecast
Is the Coldest Weather Behind New York City for the Season?
Information on AccuWeather's New iPhone App

Tune in to AccuWeather Live Midday every weekday at noon EST. We will be talking about the most recent storm and how long the cold air will last.

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