Pacific Northwest Coast Will Have a Cool Start to Summer

May 10, 2012; 1:33 AM ET
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Lincoln County, Ore., Coast from Gary Weathers and Corbis Images.

It will be slightly cooler than normal for the Pacific Northwest Coast early this summer, while the interior Northwest will warm up nicely.

Chilly water just offshore of the Pacific Northwest is expected to have an influence on temperatures west of the Cascades during June, according to AccuWeather.com Lead Long-Range Forecaster Paul Pastelok.

With a large dome of high pressure dominating the eastern Rockies and Plains, storm systems will track over or north of the Northwest U.S., producing a westerly, onshore flow.

While an extreme departure form normal temperatures is not anticipated, residents of Portland, Ore., may not be happy to hear that temperatures will be slightly below-normal for June, following quite a cool start to summer in 2011.

RELATED: AccuWeather 2012 Summer Forecast

According to a Portland, Ore., weather blog by Bruce Sussman, June 2011 highs were 4 degrees below normal, while July 2011 highs averaged 3 degrees below normal. Throughout the entire summer season, Portland had highs of 90 or higher on 7 days in 2011, whereas the average number of 90-degree days for the city is 13. The first day where the high in Portland climbed to 90 degrees or higher was August 20, 2011, when the thermometer soared to 96 degrees.

Since Seattle, Wash., is farther inland than Portland, temperatures should be near- to just below-normal for June of 2012.

"July into early August may be a warmer period, especially just east of the Cascades with brief hot periods," Pastelok said.

The interior Northwest will heat up during the middle to latter period of the summer as the large dome of high pressure shifts farther north and west across the Rockies.

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