Disruptive Saturday Snow Moving Through the Northeast

By , Expert Senior Meteorologist
January 18, 2014; 1:22 PM
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Play video An expert analysis on the snow in the Northeast is given in the above AccuWeather.com video.

Although not a big snowstorm, enough snow is moving through the Northeast this Saturday to cause travel disruptions and aid the skiing industry.

The weather pattern into the start of next week will favor episodes of spotty snow and flurries, produced by weak storms originating from Western Canada. These storms are called Alberta Clippers.

While these can cause minor travel problems at the local level, widespread disruptions from heavy snow are unlikely through Monday. Some roads will be coated with snow from time to time.

One intensifying clipper will continue to spread snow across the Northeast through Saturday night.

This clipper has already produced 5.0 inches of snow at Laurel Summit in western Pennsylvania and Chelmsford, Mass., which is located to the northwest of Boston.

Several inches will blanket other parts of upstate New York and New England through Saturday night as the weak storm makes a northward turn and attempts to throw moisture from the Atlantic Ocean onshore.

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The steadiest snow will fall through the evening hours.

The heaviest snow is centering on Portland, Maine, and the northern and western suburbs of Boston, where between 3 and 6 inches will accumulate with locally higher amounts.

A slushy inch or two of snow is expected in Metro Boston after the day started with a soaking and chilly rain.

Winds will kick up enough in the wake of the clipper storm to cause blowing and drifting of the small amount of snow that falls.

Another episode of spotty snow is possible on Sunday over the Northeast region, mainly over the Appalachian Mountains.

Waves of cold air will continue to move out of Canada into early next week but will first have to cross the Midwest and Great Lakes, where it will moderate.

The pattern into next week will allow some temperatures swings from one day to the next, but ski resorts will be able to keep snow on their slopes and make more snow at night, if necessary. The clipper storms will deposit a small amount of natural powder on the slopes from time to time.

Later in the month, the pattern is forecast to change to more persistent cold and perhaps more intense cold like that of early in January.

During this transition to more noteworthy cold, one or more significant storms with snow can come about, the details of which are not yet clear.

AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Kristina Pydynowski contributed to the content of this story.

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