End of Northeast, Midwest Heat Wave in Sight

By , Expert Senior Meteorologist
July 19, 2013; 6:38 AM ET
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Play video Weather Experts Elliot Abrams and Evan Myers discuss this week's heat wave and changes coming for the weekend.

An end to the heat wave is coming to the Northeast and Midwest this weekend.

The atmospheric heat pump will continue to run at full steam this week. However, folks suffering in urban areas or with limited means to keep cool will catch a break.

Actual high temperatures in most areas continued to be in the 90s through Friday. AccuWeather.com RealFeel® temperatures will be 10 to 20 degrees higher.

Changes taking place this weekend will end the extreme heat. The pattern change should also take an edge off the humidity for a couple of days.

The high pressure system responsible for driving the heat will shift westward, allowing a cool front to make progress to the east and south.

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Over the weekend, progressively less-extreme temperatures are forecast with the most noticeable drop in humidity around the Great Lakes, the interior Northeast and neighboring Canada.

The heat wave will continue Saturday over much of the mid-Atlantic and in coastal New England, before being broken Sunday.

City, State
Sat.
Sun.
Mon.
Boston
93
82
80
Hartford, Conn.
91
84
86
Providence, R.I.
93
86
84
Albany, N.Y.
86
82
84
New York
94
86
86
Trenton, N.J.
91
88
88
Philadelphia
94
89
88
Pittsburgh
86
83
83
Detroit
87
80
76
Chicago
83
80
85
Cleveland
84
82
79
Indianapolis
87
86
83
Louisville, Ky.
92
88
87
Charleston, W.Va.
90
86
86
Nashville, Tenn.
93
90
91
Dover, Del.
94
87
85
Baltimore
94
88
86
Washington
94
88
86
Richmond, Va.
94
91
89

Because of the warm waters of the Atlantic Ocean this time of year, the advance of much cooler, less humid air from the northwest may slow to a crawl and could stall over the Tennessee Valley and the southern part of mid-Atlantic. The warm ocean water sometimes acts as a natural barrier for frontal passages during July and August.

Despite this, over Virginia, the Delmarva Peninsula and over the Tennessee Valley, for example, 90- to 95-degree temperatures and high humidity are likely to be replaced with 80- to 85-degree temperatures and moderate humidity for a few days.

If the front were to move along a bit more, then the cooling and the drop in humidity could be more pronounced farther south and right along the coast.

Beyond the weekend, humidity levels are likely to creep back up throughout the region and the pattern of frequent showers and thunderstorms will soon follow. Some areas could be faced with a familiar problem from June and early July: flooding.

At this stage, it does not appear that extreme temperatures will be in a hurry to build back and stay for an extended period like it did during this week in the Northeast and in much of the Midwest.

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