Tropical Depression 09W May Become Next Typhoon

By Courtney Spamer, Meteorologist
July 12, 2014; 6:43 AM ET
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Play video Click the above video for a look at the flooding from the last West Pacific Typhoon, Neoguri.

In the Western Pacific, Tropical Depression 9W may become the next typhoon in the wake of once-Super Typhoon Neoguri.

Tropical Storm 9W was upgraded from its tropical depression status early on Friday, but it has recently lost organization and is now a tropical depression once again.

However, it should move into a more conducive environment for strengthening, and may eventually become Typhoon Rammasun.

The above image is of Tropical Depression 9W from satellite on Saturday morning, local time in the Pacific Ocean. Imagery courtesy of NOAA

The system will continue to move westward away from Guam through the weekend and into next week.

If it does indeed hold together, it will be in the vicinity of Luzon, Philippines, on Wednesday or Thursday.

If the storm remains at typhoon strength, locals in the Philippines will need to brace for extreme winds and heavy, torrential rainfall that could lead to mudslides.

RELATED:
Neoguri Inflicts Damage in Japan
Local Weather Across the Philippines
AccuWeather.com Forecast for Manila, PH

Meteorologists in the AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center will be monitoring this strengthening storm in anticipation of its possible effects in the Philippines and, eventually, into China.

AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Dave Samuhel contributed to the content of this story.

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