Nadine Becomes a Tropical Storm, Again

September 26, 2012; 4:56 AM
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National Hurricane Center satellite image of Nadine from Sunday. The storm is on the top of the picture, just northwest of the coast of Africa

Tropical Storm Nadine has re-formed in the eastern Atlantic. Nadine is located more than 500 miles south of the Azores. The storm has sustained winds of 45 mph.

The NASA Global Hawk had been investigating Nadine earlier this week. The unmanned drone aircraft dropped weather instrumentation into the system. The data showed Nadine had reached tropical storm strength.

Fortunately, the impacts from Nadine will be minimal. The storm is not near any landmass, and it is nearly stationary. It will drift to the west very slowly over the next several days. However, atmospheric conditions will be favorable for slow strengthening. Nadine could become a hurricane later this week. Again, Nadine is not expected to impact land for at least the next five days.

For more information and additional graphics check out the AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center.

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