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    Extreme Heat Wave Comes to End for Midwest, Mid-Atlantic

    By , Meteorologist
    July 10, 2012; 9:01 AM ET
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    Wyatt Young, 5, cools off in a fountain set up outside Busch Stadium before a baseball game between the St. Louis Cardinals and the Miami Marlins Friday, July 6, 2012, in St. Louis. Excessive-heat warnings remained in place Friday for all of Iowa, Indiana and Illinois as well as much of Wisconsin, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio and Kentucky. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

    A scorching heat wave that affected much of the eastern two-thirds of the nation, setting an astonishing number of temperature records, has ended across the Midwest and mid-Atlantic.

    While the heat wave wave subsides across portions of the East, scorching heat shifts into the West.

    Helping to break down the heat in the South will be a zone of drenching showers and thunderstorms from Texas to North Carolina and southern Virginia.

    Meteorologist Bill Deger reports that at least 75 deaths were attributed to the intense heat.

    More than 3,840 temperature records were shattered in the U.S. from July 1- 8, 2012, according to NOAA. The tally of record high temperatures during the time period is 2,476, and the tally of maximum low temperature records is 1,365.

    Since the beginning of July, 142 all-time record highs have been set or tied across 19 states.

    Some cities also went down in the record books challenging record streaks of brutal high temperatures.

    St. Louis was located in the heart of the heat wave. The mercury soared to 100 degrees or higher for ten days in a row in St. Louis through Saturday, making it the second longest streak of 100-degree temperatures since 1936.

    Chicago's temperature has climbed to 100 degrees or higher for 3 consecutive days Wednesday through Friday. This is the first time since August of 1947 that Chicago hit 100 or higher for 3 days in a row. This streak has since broken as temperatures cooled Saturday afternoon, reaching 98.

    Saturday became the 4th consecutive day of 100 degree plus high temperatures in Fort Wayne, Ind. This broke the old record of consecutive 100 degree days which was set in 1988.

    Meanwhile, Washington, D.C., hit 95 degrees or higher for the eleventh consecutive day on Sunday, the longest streak ever recorded. That streak will end tomorrow as cooler air slides in from the north.

    Sampling of Record Highs on July 8

    City
    High
    Old Daily Record
    Washington D.C. (Reagan)
    102
    100 (1993)
    Baltimore, Md.
    100 (tied)
    100 (1993)
    Richmond, Va.
    103
    102 (1993)
    Norfolk, Va.
    100 (tied)
    100 (1993)
    Roanoke, Va.
    102
    101 (1977)
    Lynchburg, Va.
    101
    99 (1977)
    Charlotte, N.C.
    101 (tied)
    101 (2010)
    Raleigh, N.C.
    105
    103 (1977)

    Sampling of Record Highs on July 7

    City
    High
    Old Daily Record
    Columbia, Mo.
    106
    104 (1890)
    Lamoni, Ia.
    102
    100 (1989)
    St. Louis, Mo.
    107
    103 (1936)
    Des Moines, Ia.
    100 (tied)
    100 (1936)
    Columbus, Ohio
    101
    100 (1988)
    Dayton, Ohio
    102
    100 (1988)
    Georgetown, Del.
    103
    97 (2010)
    Indianapolis, Ind.
    105
    101 (1936)
    Akron-Canton, Ohio
    101
    100 (1988)
    Atlantic City, N.J.
    100
    98 (2010)
    Washington D.C. (Reagan)
    105
    102 (2010)
    Louisville, Ky.
    106
    102 (1874)

    Sampling of Record Highs on July 6

    City
    High
    Old Daily Record
    Little Rock, Ark.
    107
    104 (1998)
    Fort Smith, Ark.
    106
    105 (2011)
    Nashville, Tenn.
    105
    100 (1874)
    St. Louis, Mo.
    106
    102 (1936)
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    104
    98 (1874)
    Grand Rapids, Mich.
    104
    100 (1988)
    Kansas City, Mo.
    104
    103 (1954)
    Chicago, Ill.
    103
    99 (1988)
    Lansing, Mich.
    103 (all-time record)
    100 (1988)
    Louisville, Ky.
    103
    97 (1991)
    Madison, Wis.
    102
    100 (1886)
    Memphis, Tenn.
    102
    96 (2010)
    Columbus, Ohio
    101
    98 (1881)
    Chattanooga, Tenn.
    100
    98 (1977)

    Sampling of Record Highs on July Fourth

    City
    High
    Old Daily Record
    St. Louis, Mo.
    105
    102 (1990)
    Twin Cities, Minn.
    101
    100 (1949)
    Detroit, Mich.
    102
    98 (1990)
    Madison, Wis.
    102
    98 (1955)
    Milwaukee, Wis.
    102
    98 (1990)
    Chicago, Ill.
    102 (tied)
    102 (1911)
    Imperial, Neb.
    106 (tied)
    106 (1978)
    North Platte, Neb.
    106 (tied)
    106 (1936)
    Memphis, Tenn.
    100 (tied)
    100 (1954)
    Fort Smith, Ark.
    103
    102 (1990)
    Fayetteville, Ark.
    99
    102 (1990)
    Hunstville, Ala.
    102
    100 (1928)
    Tupelo, Miss.
    100 (tied)
    100 (1956)
    Raleigh, N.C.
    101
    99 (2011)

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