Magnitude-3.3 Earthquake Shakes Los Angeles Area

By Mark Leberfinger, AccuWeather.com Staff Writer
May 8, 2014; 8:49 AM ET
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An earthquake was felt across a wide swath of the Los Angeles area late Wednesday night.

No significant damage was reported, the Los Angeles Fire Department said on its website.

The magnitude-3.3 quake's epicenter was reported just outside Cudahy, California, the U.S. Geological Survey said.

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The fire department said it went into Emergency Earthquake Mode (EEM) after the temblor.

"When operating in the EEM, firefighters from all 106 neighborhood fire stations promptly move to a designated safe area and then initiate a "windshield survey" as they drive through their first-in district," the department said. "In this manner, over 470 square miles in the greater Los Angeles area can be assessed in a matter of minutes. The department's six helicopters and five fire boats assist the appraisal."

The quake was felt across the Los Angeles area by more than 2,100 people who reported to the USGS website that they felt the quake, which was felt from Thousand Oaks, California, to Huntingdon Beach and in cities surrounding Los Angeles.

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