Long-Standing Record Highs Hit in Major Midwestern Cities

June 7, 2011; 7:50 AM ET
Share |

"The fact that this many long-standing records have been tied or broken indicates the severity of the heat."


Numerous record highs were broken from Texas to Minnesota on Monday, and many of the records were set more than 75 years ago!

The fact that this many long-standing records have been tied or broken indicates the severity of the heat. Parts of the Midwest are in for two or more days of record-smashing heat, while the 90-degree warmth also expands into the East.

Highs will soar into the 90s today and tomorrow in Chicago and through Thursday in Detroit.

AccuWeather.com RealFeel® temperatures will feel even hotter than actual thermometer readings due to high humidity gripping the Midwest.

The mercury at St. Louis, Mo., soared to 97 degrees, tying the record high for the date set in 1934, or 77 years ago!

Rochester, Minn., broke a record from even farther back, 78 years. The high climbed to 96 degrees there, tying the record set in 1933.

In Milwaukee, Wis., the high hit 94 degrees, surpassing the 86-year standing record high of 93 degrees from 1925.

Other records highs tied or broken on Monday:

--Minneapolis, Minn.: 97 degrees (Old: 95/1987)

--Mason City, Iowa: 98 degrees (Old: 97/1933) 78 years old

--Imperial, Neb.: 100 degrees (Tied: 100/1933) 78 years old

--Valentine, Neb.: 102 degrees (Old: 99/1987)

--Jonesboro, Ark.: 99 degrees (Old: 98/1925) 86 years old

--Batesville, Ark.: 97 degrees (Old: 94/1940) 71 years old

--Monticello, Ark.: 100 degrees (Old: 97/1977)

--Colorado Springs, Colo.: 93 degrees (Old: 90/1988)

--Laredo, Texas: 107 degrees (Old: 106/1995)

Comments

Comments left here should adhere to the AccuWeather.com Community Guidelines. Profanity, personal attacks, and spam will not be tolerated.

More Weather News

Daily U.S. Extremes

past 24 hours

  Extreme Location
High N/A
Low N/A
Precip N/A

WeatherWhys®

This Day In Weather History

Portland, OR (1892)
27.5" of snow (21st-24th).

Richmond, VA (1942)
-1 degree F earliest ever below zero.

New York City (1959)
15" of snow.