Irene's Infamous Top Ten Statistics

August 30, 2011; 8:12 PM ET
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<a href="http://www.facebook.com/AccuWeather">AccuWeather.com Facebook fan</a> Rick A. captured Irene's visit in Shippan Point in Stamford, Conn., earlier Sunday.

Irene caused damaging wind and excessive rain from the Carolinas to New England. Here are the highest rainfall and wind totals that we have seen from the storm:

Rainfall

  1. Virginia Beach, Va., 20.40 inches
  2. Jacksonville, N.C., 20.00 inches
  3. Bunyan, N.C., 15.66 inches
  4. New Bern, N.C., 14.79 inches
  5. Williamstown, N.C., 14.27 inches
  6. Leonardtown, Md., 13.35 inches
  7. East Durham, N.Y., 13.30 inches
  8. Washington, N.C., 13.11 inches
  9. Plum Point, Md., 12.96 inches
  10. Ft. Eustis, Va., 12.52 inches

Wind Gusts

  1. Mt. Washington, N.H., 120 mph
  2. Cedar Island, N.C., 115 mph
  3. Fort Macon, N.C., 92 mph
  4. Sayville, N.Y., 91 mph
  5. Hatteras, N.C., 88 mph
  6. Conimicut, R.I., 83 mph
  7. Barrington, R.I., 82 mph
  8. Buxton, N.C., 79 mph
  9. Soyosset Mobile, N.Y., 79 mph

  10. Cape Lookout, N.C., 78 mph

Irene's heavy rain triggered flooding in Steelville, Pa. (Photo submitted by AccuWeather.com Facebook fan Beata A. on Sunday.)

Now, here are the top three for each state affected:

South Carolina
RainfallWind
Myrtle Beach, 3.62 inchesSpringmaid Pier, 62 mph
Murrells Inlet, 3.15 inchesNorth Myrtle Beach, 49 mph
Pawley's Island, 2.95 inchesMyrtle Beach, 44 mph


North Carolina
RainfallWind
Jacksonville, 20.00 inchesCedar Island, 115 mph
Bunyan, 15.66 inchesFort Macon, 92 mph
New Bern, 14.79 inchesHatteras, 88 mph


Virginia
RainfallWind
Virginia Beach, 20.40 inchesWilliamsburg, 76 mph
Suffolk, 11.04 inchesRichmond, 70 mph
Newland, 10.50 inchesDahlgren, 67 mph


Maryland
RainfallWind
Leonardtown, 13.35 inchesCobb Island, 73 mph
Plum Point, 12.96 inchesChesapeake Beach, 72 mph
Ri, 12.09 inchesGaithersburg, 72 mph


Delaware
RainfallWind
Federalsburg, 8.50 inchesLewe's, 56 mph
Blackbird 8.41 inchesDelaware City, 51 mph
Ellendale 8.34 inchesGeorgetown, 43 mph


New Jersey
RainfallWind
Freehold Twp., 11.27 inchesSaint George, 70 mph
Little Falls Twp., 10.71 inchesTuckerton, 69 mph
Stockton, 10.32 inchesOcean City, 66 mph


Pennsylvania
RainfallWind
Lafayette, 8.82 inchesMount Pocono, 56 mph
Forks Twp., 8.53 inchesPhiladelphia, 52 mph
Gouldsboro, 8.00 inchesFort Indiantown, 52 mph


New York
RainfallWind
East Durham, 13.30 inchesSayville, 91 mph
East Jewett, 12.22 inchesSyosset Mobile, 79 mph
Monroe, 11.79 inchesEast Moriches, 71 mph


Massachusetts
RainfallWind
Savoy, 9.10 inchesEast Milton, 81 mph
Shelburne Falls, 8.50 inchesFairhaven, 72 mph
Tolland, 7.90 inchesNorwood, 66 mph


Rhode Island
RainfallWind
Warren, 5.37 inchesConimicut, 83 mph
Pawtucket, 2.98 inchesBarrington, 82 mph
Providence, 1.92 inchesWarwick, 64 mph


Connecticut
RainfallWind
New Hartford, 10.15 inchesGroton, 67 mph
Burlington, 8.70 inchesThompson, 66 mph
East Hartford, 8.18 inchesBridgeport, 63 mph


Vermont
RainfallWind
Mendon, 11.23 inchesBurlington, 51 mph
Walden, 7.60 inchesMorrisville, 40 mph
Randolph Center, 7.15 inchesSpringfield, 40 mph


New Hampshire
RainfallWind
Pinkham Notch, 7.33 inchesMt. Washington, 120 mph
Sandwhich, 6.09 inchesPortsmouth, 63 mph
Washington, 6.00 inchesStratford, E60 mph


Maine
RainfallWind
Baxter St. Park, 9.10 inchesAugusta, 56 mph
Phillips, 6.34 inchesBar Harbor, 53 mph
Andover, 6.20 inchesPortland, 52 mph

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