Ice Storm Threatens Va.-Pa. I-81 Corridor

By , Senior Meteorologist
December 8, 2013; 4:00 PM ET
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The worst of the ice headed to the eastern U.S. will focus on the I-81 corridor from Virginia to southern Pennsylvania.

An icy mix threatens to cause slick travel and some power outages over a large part of the Ohio Valley, mid-Atlantic and Northeast Sunday through Monday.

However, it is the I-81 corridor from Roanoke, Va., to Hagerstown, Md., to Harrisburg, Pa., where the most significant icing--amounts approaching or topping a half of an inch--will unfold.

Other cities in this zone include Blacksburg, Harrisonburg and Winchester, Va., and Martinsburg, W. Va.

The danger also encompasses the neighboring mountain valleys of western Virginia and eastern West Virginia, including the communities of Hot Springs, Va., and Beckley, W. Va.

Residents should prepare for widespread power outages and tree damage. Falling tree branches could cause additional damage and bodily harm depending on where they land.

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Travel will become extremely treacherous not just on I-81 but also I-64, I-68, I-70 and I-77.

The worst icing will commence in Virginia's southernmost I-81 corridor Sunday morning, then will spread northward and reach Harrisburg, Pa., Sunday night.

After lasting roughly 6 to 12 hours, the ice will end as some rain or drizzle in a similar south-to-north fashion Sunday night through Monday morning.

Preceding the ice will be a period of snow and sleet, which will accumulate a general 1 to 3 inches and make roads and sidewalks slippery for those heading to church, shopping or other plans on Sunday.

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