I-95 Severe Weather Risk Monday

By , Expert Senior Meteorologist
October 15, 2012; 7:30 PM
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The last gasp in the series of severe weather will affect part of the I-95 corridor for the evening drive Monday.

A storm system and trailing cold front have produced over 100 incidents of severe weather in the central and southwestern United States, including nearly a dozen reports of possible tornadoes. That system has reached the East Coast Monday.

The area from the Delmarva and southeastern Virginia to southeastern Georgia will be in an area favorable for thunderstorms Monday afternoon into the evening.

Some of the storms will be briefly severe with blinding downpours and strong wind gusts. There is the potential for flash and urban flooding as well as a few downed trees and sporadic power outages.

As the storms and their downpours push toward the coast, roadway and flight delays are possible.

The greatest potential for localized severe weather is from Richmond and Norfolk, Va. to Raleigh and Wilmington, N.C., Myrtle Beach and Charleston, S.C., and Savannah, Ga.

Locally gusty thunderstorms and disruptive downpours will also reach part of Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and New York City metro areas into Monday evening rush.

Drenching rain and thunder will swing across New England Monday night.

Be alert for rapidly changing weather conditions if you will be on the road or outdoors.

Slightly cooler weather will follow the rain and storms for Tuesday and Wednesday. However, it will be a far cry from the chill the delivered a frost and freeze to many areas at the start of this past weekend. Temperatures will trend above normal later in the week.

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