Hurricane Sandy's Travel Disruptions to Reach Houston

By , Senior Meteorologist
October 28, 2012; 3:07 AM ET
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Despite making landfall more than a thousand miles away, Sandy still threatens to impact some people in Houston early next week.

Skies will be no worse than partly sunny in Houston Monday and Tuesday, but airline passengers may find themselves stranded at the George Bush Intercontinental Airport with Hurricane Sandy to blame.

The Northeast is bracing for a historic event Monday and Tuesday as Sandy moves onshore with widespread damaging winds, flooding rain, severe coastal flooding and high-elevation snow.

The severity of the situation is sure to force airlines to cancel flights throughout the Northeast, including at the heavily-traveled airports around New York City, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C.

The ripple-effect from these cancelled flights threatens to create a travel nightmare in Houston with airline passengers waiting for planes that are held up in the Northeast.

The flight backlog created by Sandy may take extra long to fix since the storm (which will no longer be a tropical system after Tuesday) may not fully exit the Northeast until next weekend.

Those flying to and from Houston next week, especially from Monday to Wednesday, should consider trying to reschedule their flight to this weekend.

Thumbnail photo courtesy of Photos.com.

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