Devastating Heat Wave Continues Kansas City to DC

July 2, 2012; 12:15 PM ET
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Millions of people from the Plains to the South and mid-Atlantic will continue to battle a devastating heat wave that has already reached historic proportions.

Click here to see the latest news story on the unrelenting heat in the U.S.

Multiple cities across multiple states set or tied all-time record high temperatures since last week.

One of the cities hardest hit by this unprecedented heat wave is Charlotte, N.C. For the third consecutive day Sunday, the Queen City tied their all-time record high temperature of 104.

St. Louis, Little Rock, Kansas City and Nashville will in the core of the heat through the week with daytime highs within a few degrees of 100.

Meanwhile, as temperatures may be a few degrees lower around Washington, D.C., Charlotte and Atlanta, it is still dangerously hot. Many folks from the Ohio Valley to Virginia were without power Monday in the wake of devastating storms over the weekend.

For some it means not only no fans, but no running water for homeowners that have independent well water and no means to operate the pump.

Cities along the Eastern Seaboard, such as New York City, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. will climb well into the 90s through the weekend. Folks in the Ohio Valley will endure highs well into the 90s through the week.

The heat will continue to hamper cleanup efforts from Friday's derecho, which left millions across the Plains and mid-Atlantic without power.

It will also drive more showers and thunderstorms, some of which may turn severe, especially over the Great Lakes

The large dome of high pressure responsible for the heat will slowly weaken through next week, gradually putting an end to the record-setting numbers. However, temperatures will remain well above normal for much of the eastern half of the country through at least Independence Day.

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